Order Now Order Now Pre-order Slide English Mommy, I Need My Wheels Mommy, I Need My Wheels is a children’s picture book about learning to ride a bike like a big kid. Eddy wants to ride his bike, but the training wheels are gone! Daddy took them off so Eddy could learn to ride without them, but Eddy is used to riding with the training wheels, and he is upset. Who knew riding a bike could be so hard? When Eddy crashes his bike and falls off, he is ready to give up. Will Eddy ever ride his bike without the training wheels? Find out if riding the bike does get easier! Order Now Slide Haitian Creole Manman, Mwen Bezwen Wou Mwen Yo Manman, Mwen Bezwen wou Mwen Yo se yon liv timoun, ki pale de lè timoun ap aprann monte bisiklèt san wou sipò yo.
Edi se yon timoun ki ta renmen anvi monte bisiklèt li a, men wou sipò yo te disparèt! Papa l te retire yo pou Edi te ka aprann monte bisiklèt san wou sipò yo. Men, Edi te abitye monte bisiklèt ak wou sipò yo, e sa te fè kè l pa t kontan.Èske n te konnen monte bisiklèt te ka difisil konsa?
Lè Edi fè aksidan ak bisiklèt la epi li tonbe, li te prè pou l bay vag.Èske Edi ap janm ka aprann monte bisiklèt san wou sipò yo?
Vin wè si monte yon bisiklèt ka vin pi fasil san wou sipò yo!
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Slide Out of the Darkness After she’s taken from the only home she’s ever known by a domineering yet distant father, Cynthia’s life takes a sudden turn towards despair. Away from her mother for the first time, the Haitian teenager resolves to make the best of a difficult transition to America. Life in Haiti wasn’t perfect, but it was the only life she knew. Now, suddenly uprooted, Cynthia’s troubles have only just begun. And when she loses the only source of unconditional love she’s ever known, can she fight her way back from the brink? Pre-order Slide Available in audio and ebook Suzette and the One-Eyed Cat An adopted girl travels to Haiti to meet her biological family for the first time. Escorted by her adoptive parents, she is filled with many fears. Why didn’t her birth parents keep her? Was there something wrong with her? Was she so different that she could not stay with them in Haiti? What will her family be like? As she experiences the village of her birth, Suzette meets her birth mother, siblings, and a one-eyed cat. The encounter with the cat leaves a lasting impression and is the key to Suzette’s journey. Join her on this incredible adventure to find her inner truth. Coming Soon Slide Coming Soon Suzette Ak Chat Yon Sèl Grenn Je a Available in audio and ebook Yon ti fi yo te adopte te deside vwayaje pou premye fwa an Ayiti pou rankontre fanmi matènèl li yo. Paran adoptif li yo te akonpanye l, men li te pè anpil.
Poukisa paran matènèl li yo pa t kenbe l?
Èske l te gen yon bagay ki pa t mache lakay li? Èske se paske li te tèlman diferan ki koz yo pa t ka kite l rete avèk yo an Ayiti? Kijan de moun yo ye? Pandan li rive nan vilaj kote li te pran nesans lan, li te fè anpil eksperyans. Li rankontre frè ak sè li yo ak yon chat ki te genyen yon sèl grenn je. Rankont ak chat la se kle vwayaj la pou Suzette.
Vin swiv Suzette nan avanti sa a pou l jwenn tout verite ki andedan fon kè l.

More About Jeanne Fortune

Photo By: Aisha

Jeanne is the author of Mommy, I Need My Wheels, a children’s book that
portrays an interracial family, and Out of the Darkness, a crossover novel
about the life of an immigrant teenager from Haiti. Her latest book is Suzette
and the One-Eyed Cat, a story about a little girl adopted from Haiti who meets
her biological family for the first time.

Today, fueled by a desire to inspire children, young adults, and women, she writes
authoritatively and creatively on issues of social justice to help others cope
with life’s predicaments.

Born and raised in Haiti, Jeanne currently lives in the United States with her
husband and children. She enjoys watching TV, reading, and traveling the world. She is the founder of
Learn Haitian Creole / Aprann Kreyòl Ayisyen, a website that provides texts,
games, and videos for those interested in learning Haitian Creole.

Public Libraries
mommy i need my wheels

English

Mommy, I Need My Wheels

Mommy, I Need My Wheels is a children’s picture book about learning to ride a bike like a big kid. Eddy wants to ride his bike, but the training wheels are gone! Daddy took them off so Eddy could learn to ride without them, but Eddy is used to riding with the training wheels, and he is upset. Who knew riding a bike could be so hard? When Eddy crashes his bike and falls off, he is ready to give up. Will Eddy ever ride his bike without the training wheels? Find out if riding the bike does get easier!

Order

Available in hardcover, paperback, Audiobook, and eBook 

Audio

English

Out Of The Darkness

Available in hardcover, paperback, Audiobook, and eBook 

After she’s taken from the only home she’s ever known by a domineering yet distant father, Cynthia’s life takes a sudden turn towards despair. Away from her mother for the first time, the Haitian teenager resolves to make the best of a difficult transition to America. Life in Haiti wasn’t perfect, but it was the only life she knew. Now, suddenly uprooted, Cynthia’s troubles have only just begun. And when she loses the only source of unconditional love she’s ever known, can she fight her way back from the brink?

Pre-order
Audio

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Out Of The Darkness by Jeanne Fortune

Out Of The Darkness

by Jeanne Fortune

Giveaway ends December 14, 2021.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

Haitian Creole

Manman, Mwen Bezwen Wou Mwen Yo

Manman, Mwen Bezwen wou Mwen Yo se yon liv timoun, ki pale de lè timoun ap aprann monte bisiklèt san wou sipò yo.

 Edi se yon timoun ki ta renmen anvi monte bisiklèt li a, men wou sipò yo te disparèt! Papa l te retire yo pou Edi te ka aprann monte bisiklèt san wou sipò yo. Men, Edi te abitye monte bisiklèt ak wou sipò yo, e sa te fè kè l pa t kontan.

 Èske n te konnen monte bisiklèt te ka difisil konsa?

Lè Edi fè aksidan ak bisiklèt la epi li tonbe, li te prè pou l bay vag.

Èske Edi ap janm ka aprann monte bisiklèt san wou sipò yo?

Vin wè si monte yon bisiklèt ka vin pi fasil san wou sipò yo!

Order

Available in hardcover and Audiobook 

Audio

English

Suzette and the One-Eyed Cat

An adopted girl travels to Haiti to meet her biological family for the first time. Escorted by her adoptive parents, she is filled with many fears. Why didn’t her birth parents keep her? Was there something wrong with her? Was she so different that she could not stay with them in Haiti? What will her family be like? As she experiences the village of her birth, Suzette meets her birth mother, siblings, and a one-eyed cat. The encounter with the cat leaves a lasting impression and is the key to Suzette’s journey. Join her on this incredible adventure to find her inner truth.

Coming Soon

Available in audio and ebook

Audio

Haitian Creole

Suzette Ak Chat Yon Sèl Grenn Je a

 Yon ti fi yo te adopte te deside vwayaje pou premye fwa an Ayiti pou rankontre fanmi matènèl li yo. Paran adoptif li yo te akonpanye l, men li te pè anpil.
Poukisa paran matènèl li yo pa t kenbe l?
Èske l te gen yon bagay ki pa t mache lakay li? Èske se paske li te tèlman diferan ki koz yo pa t ka kite l rete avèk yo an Ayiti? Kijan de moun yo ye? Pandan li rive nan vilaj kote li te pran nesans lan, li te fè anpil eksperyans. Li rankontre frè ak sè li yo ak yon chat ki te genyen yon sèl grenn je. Rankont ak chat la se kle vwayaj la pou Suzette.
Vin swiv Suzette nan avanti sa a pou l jwenn tout verite ki andedan fon kè l.

Coming Soon

Available in audio and ebook

Audio

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Review

Mommy, I need my Wheels is a good read. The book is about a boy name Eddy who goes through a challenge and with the help of his parents, he finds a valuable solution. If you are looking for a children’s book that features an interracial family, look no further. This book affirms and empowers with a message that it is okay to be different and you are wonderful just the way you are. While the book does not focus on the race, it is highlighted in its illustration. All in all the book is for everyone, as its message is good for all children.

Jeanne Fortune’s Mommy, I Need My Wheels captures one of the most challenging progressions for a young child: from trike to bike with training wheels to biking on their own. The balance issue seems an impossible feat for most kids. Fortune’s book lets kids know they’re not the only ones who feel they need their wheels and that practicing with their parents’ help will soon have them up and riding with the big kids. I loved how Eddy’s mom calmly reassures him and gives him confidence through her own belief in him. Kids learn that practice, and not being afraid to fall and get up again, will soon have them happily free of the training wheels. A grand selection for storytime, the language used in this book makes it also ideal for new readers to try on their own. Mommy, I Need My Wheels is highly recommended.

Jack Magnus, Readers' Favorite

MOMMY, I NEED MY WHEELS Book Summary

This lovely book follows the journey of a young boy named Eddy who finds himself lost after realizing his bicycle’s training wheels are missing. He fears he may never be able to ride his bike again. Eddy must make a decision to learn to ride without training wheels or risk never riding his bike again.

Family and Identity

What I loved most about this book is how it is so valuable in understanding the connection between family and identity as a jumping off point to confidence. The author of this #ownvoices has based the main character on her son. She adopted him from Haiti into their multiracial (Caucasian American /Haitian family. Since Eddy was darker than his siblings, her family are no strangers colorism. Furthermore, colorism can have devastating effects on a child’s self-worth.

This story has a relatable arc where we see Eddy riding a bike for the first time without training wheels. Readers will immediately identify with his uncertainty and wanting to keep security that the training wheels affords him. To begin the story, Eddy pleads with his parents to keep his training wheels. In turn, they lovingly challenge him to tackle the challenge of riding a bike without them.

Overcoming Obstacles

As the story continues, we see Eddy having to fall and get back up again. However, woven into the story are illustrations where children have the opportunity to see a multiracial family simply living their life together— Eddy’s family sitting down for dinner, his dad doing the dishes, his mom giving him a bath.

Eddy’s parents encourage him as he pedals, dust him off after a big fall, and finally, promise him treats when he masters the task. Readers will delight in seeing Eddy, not only face, but conquer his fears.

In the end, stories like this one with simple challenges are ideal for young readers mental health. This is especially true now when the world is full of uncertainty. Kids are facing school closures, sick family members, and not being able to socialize with friends due to COVID-19. Books can be instrumental in helping children overcome trauma.

I highly recommend MOMMY, I NEED MY WHEELS for your home or classroom library. (Available in English/Haitian Creole.)

Bethany Edwards, Biracial Bookworms

A Haitian immigrant recounts her struggles to find happiness in the United States.

In this historical novel, Fortune tells an immigration story through the eyes of Cynthia Josaphat, a Haitian girl sent to live with her father in Massachusetts as a teen. Cynthia, along with her siblings Sheila and Paul, moves in with her father, Michel, called Micho. He is both determined to have his children with him and neglectful of them, often to an abusive degree (“All three of us were breaking down in the house,” Cynthia says at one point). Cynthia grapples with learning English and adapting to life in a new country as well as Micho’s unreasonable expectations. She also misses her mother and her extended family in Haiti. After her mother’s death, Cynthia finds that her relationship with Micho deteriorates further. She begins to fend for herself, living with friends and relatives in Massachusetts and Georgia while trying to finish school, keep a job, and handle bouts of depression. Cynthia moves from place to place and from one bad relationship to another, dealing with the challenges of poverty and trying to balance her needs against the expectation that she will make a better life for herself in the U.S. than she could have in Haiti. Cynthia’s distant, first-person narration gives a retrospective feel to the text. “Georgia was a tough place to try to find work back then,” she explains, “that was before digital video disks (DVDs) and the internet were popular” is another clue to the never precisely defined era the tale takes place in. This approach often leaves the book feeling more like a memoir than a novel. But Fortune does an excellent job of worldbuilding, bringing the story’s multiple settings to life and conveying the stress and confusion Cynthia feels as she tries to navigate challenging situations made more difficult by the cultural context she finds herself in. Cynthia’s ultimate triumph, delivered in an epilogue, is satisfying.

A solid, if occasionally uneven, cross-cultural coming-of-age tale.

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